Posted in Blog

Today I’d like to introduce the author of The King of Kishar, Timothy Scott Currey

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

I have always had a lot of creative and artistic hobbies, and through my childhood I dabbled a bit with everything. Music, acting, singing, you name it. I was a very daydreamy kid as well, always off in my own worlds, always with my nose in a book. If I liked a story or a movie, I tended to become obsessed, and just read/watch it over and over.

Writing books was just a natural extension of those tendencies, and my desire to just replicate in some small way the stories I grew up loving.

Describe your desk / writing space.

I write on a computer that had once been for games, which is on top of a fairly beaten-up second-hand white desk. There’s a little turtle-shaped lamp, and the light shines out through a mosaic of stained-glass pieces that make up its shell. I also have a couple fidget toys on hand to help when my brain is idling.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

I definitely try to be strict with myself, but I know that the inspiration comes in waves. When the inspiration comes, there’s no problem, but I work hard to try and let myself back off a bit when it feels like the creative juice is drying up. It can sometimes be hard to keep from being disappointed during those lulls!

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

Hardest scene to write: There was a scene which amounted to being a philosophical showdown between the protagonist and the antagonist. I wanted to make it an interesting, climactic back-and-forth that had all the stakes of a sword fight. As tough as I found it to carry out a conversation as though it had all the excitement of a life-or-death battle, I think I did the best I could and I hope it comes across well.

Favorite scene to write: There was a chariot chase through the streets of a Mesopotamian-inspired city, and I just found it super exciting to write, which also made it easy to write. You just don’t see chariot chases much outside of old sword & sandal movies!

What inspired your book/series?

I became really excited about the idea of writing in an ancient, Mesopotamian-inspired setting like the one in The King & Kishar.  I had been spending time reading about the Epic of Gilgamesh and leafing through old encyclopedias about the Sumerians, and the idea just really took hold of me. I thought a lot about how the invention of writing was such a crucial turning point in those days, and that’s reflected in the writing-based magic system.

Who is your favorite character from your book and would you get along?

My favorite character was Sannan, who was a little bit of a side character to be honest. She is a bit of an outcast, and has a quite sad backstory. I am sure we would get along, because she has a good heart, but she is also perceptive and brutally honest at times. Hard truths, even those delivered by a friend, can still sting.

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

It would have to be Bag End. I’m quite tall, and would have to crouch to avoid constantly bumping my head on the ceiling.

Still worth it!

How do you come up with the title to your books?

It’s different for every book, and I honestly don’t think I have a process down yet. Sometimes it’s the setting or situation, sometimes it’s a character’s name. It’s something I’m actively working on getting better at, because after all, the title is one of the first things a reader will see.

What are you working on next?

Next I’m going way the other way in terms of historical settings, and I’m writing a trilogy that has flintlock technology, humans and elves, and telepathic magic. It will be different in pretty much every way, especially in terms of its much larger scope.

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

Garth Nix, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ernest Hemingway, JRR Tolkien, Ray Bradbury, John Steinbeck, David Gemmell, Weis & Hickman, Neil Gaiman, Brian Jacques, Josiah Bancroft, Stephen King, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and many more. 

What is your favorite meal?

For me, nothing beats chicken vindaloo with fresh naan.

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

Coffee over tea, wine over beer. In both cases, that’s only a 60/40 preference.

Describe yourself in three words.

Creative, inquisitive, indecisive.  

Bio:

“I am a fantasy author living in Bunbury in Western Australia. 

It’s a city in a region with amazing biodiversity and criss-crossed all over with hiking trails, so you can bet nature is an inspiration in a lot of my stories. The wineries are killer, too. 

I have a thousand hobbies, some big and some little. They wax and wane over time. Right now I’m super into gardening, gaming, re-watching The Office twice a year, squash (the sport not the veg), and staring blankly at walls while I figure plot points out.”

Every word King Adzi Akkatha writes on sacred stones is binding, and lasts for all eternity. 

But how can he rule when he has been cursed to forget everything?

His city is in chaos. Hinatsi rebels clash with his soldiers, and their mysterious leaders try to capture the King.

With the help of High Priestess Idza and General Qanatha, he must relearn their laws and customs, and who he was as a King. His former self seemed cruel and cold, and he is plagued with doubts. He is an imposter in King’s clothing—do they even have the right man? 

They must flee to the great Temple of Mesopos where the King’s memory might be restored. The rebels are never far behind, and day by day the curse progresses. 

There is little hope they will reach the temple in time. 

Even if they do, will the King want to continue ruling as a cold tyrant?

Posted in Uncategorized

DNA has Arrived!

It’s been a hectic few months, but finally DNA Demons N Angels is on sale.

Get your copy today!

And don’t forget to leave a review!

It’s weird how every woman reacts differently. How each pregnancy differs.

Mine is definitely unique.

My sense of smell became stronger, picking up the faintest odors, and my stomach was in constant turmoil. Those were the first signs.

And then I started eating. And eating. If I don’t, I get a migraine and people’s faces become blurry. Electronics seem to malfunction in my presence. And the nightmares—they don’t stop.

Something is changing my body.

Something that should have never happened.

Something that my husband and I had prevented from happening.

Something people say is miraculous.

The bigger I get, the more frequently I encounter people who become possessed. And the more often I wind up questioning if I am carrying a miracle baby.

The closer I get to the due date, the more I love this child and the more confident I am that I will protect my baby from anything.

Even its fate.

DNA Demons N Angels contains violence, swearing, and sex scenes. If you are looking for a clean, curse free book, this isn’t it.

Posted in Blog

YouTube Interview

DNA Demons N Angels comes out today! To celebrate I did an interview with author A.J. Park.

It was a ton of fun, even if there were internet gremlins. 😉

Click here to find out my about A.J. Park

Enjoy the short interview!

Posted in Blog

Today I’d like to introduce the author of Hooded, book one of The Furix Rising Series, A.A. Woods.

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

I don’t think there’s ever been a time in my life where I haven’t told stories. Even when I was a kid on the playground, my mom used to catch me telling strangers all about myself in vivid, usually fictional detail (they’d often compliment my mom on what an ‘exciting life’ their young daughter had lived, and she’d whisk me away with all possible haste before they figured out they’d been duped by a 5-year-old). So even though it took me until adulthood to take writing seriously as a profession, I’ve always had it in my blood.

But the real change came right at the end of college. I’d studied pre-med with the intention to become a doctor and write novels on the side (with all that free time, right?). I had everything in place, had taken all the right exams, and even scored a sweet internship at Mass General Hospital. While there, however, I began to have honest conversations with the doctors I worked with. They kept saying, “if you can think of anything else to do with your life, do that first.”

Obviously I could.

So I did.

Now, I’ve been writing professionally for seven years, with 18.5 finished novels, 10 published, and many, many more to go!

Describe your desk / writing space.

I work in the top floor of our little suburban house, which means I get to overlook a beautiful nature preserve in front of us. Whenever I’m stuck, I like to gaze out at the trees and river and, if I’m lucky, some adorable dogs playing in the park. My writing space is an L-shaped corner desk, with one branch dedicated to my day-job and the other cluttered with outlines, timelines, notebooks for the ideas I’m working on, notebooks for random and/or future ideas, a calculator (because why not?), and gum. I’m an absolute gum addict and go through one of those supersize containers about once a week. I also always have some kind of beverage handy. In the morning it’s my French Press of coffee. Later on, it’s water with lime, tea, or seltzer. Very occasionally I’ll allow myself a diet soda.

I don’t have a lot of knickknacks, since clutter tends to stress me out more than inspire me. The only non-work item on my desk is a picture of my dad skiing. It’s such a graceful and happy snapshot of life and it always inspires me that even though things are hard, they can be fun too.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

Even though I love being a writer and adore my growing pile of finished novels, I sort of low-key hate the actual act of writing. Which is why, if I waited for inspiration, I would probably never actually get any writing done.

When I’m in the drafting stage of a manuscript, I set myself a word count or chapter goal and then do my best to hit it. Because I’m an overachiever, my goals are usually out of reach, so I almost never do. Which gives me more motivation to try harder the next day!

I try to write 3-4 hours every weekday, leaving room for my day job, dog walks, and general life chores. If the weekend is quiet, I’ll get some writing done then too, but I try to keep a good work/life balance and leave my free time free. Never easy when you work from home, as so many people have learned this past year!

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

In my most recent release (Severed), the absolute hardest scene for me to write, and one I procrastinated for days, was the plot twist at the end. Obviously I won’t spoil it here, but it’s a dramatic multi-chapter character-driven sequence with about five different points of view and a million things going on. I think I’d built it up in my head so much that I was terrified I wouldn’t be able to execute this epic, awesome vision. However, upon finally braving the page and reading it during edits, I feel like I got pretty close. J

As far as my favorite scenes to write, I love writing action. When things are going so fast that my fingers can’t keep up with the words and the characters are making desperate snap-decisions, I can feel my heartrate picking up with the excitement. Fight scenes, chase scenes, any time the story has real momentum, I love that. It can be amazing too, to see what my brain comes up with in those moments. It’s almost like I’m improvising as much as the heroes!

What inspired your book/series?

Hooded was inspired because I went through a phase where couldn’t get enough of fairy tale retellings. Cinder, Uprooted, Spinning Silver, Ella Enchanted, Zel, etc. I loved how an author could play with expectation and nod at the original myth while doing entirely their own thing. Hooded actually went through three full rewrites, each time finessing and reworking the concept of a “dark fantasy Little Red Riding Hood.” Funnily enough, the end product has diverged so much from the original fairy tale that I’d be impressed if anyone recognizes the nods that remain! They’re there, but the series very much became its own beast. And now, moving into Bladed, I couldn’t be more excited to see what that turns into.

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

I would give up to and maybe including my soul to go to Hogwarts. Ever since I first read the Harry Potter Series, I’ve been waiting for my letter. I can almost convince myself that it’s actually a graduate school and my invite will be showing up any day now.

But in the real world, I would love to go back to Edinburgh. I studied aboard there my junior year of college and I’ve never fallen so in love with a city in my life. It’s a bucket-list dream of mine to live there again.

How do you come up with the title to your books?

That’s such an interesting question! Unfortunately, I don’t think I have a great answer for this. Tittles feel almost cosmic to me, like these giant puzzle pieces that slot into place one day and then just fit. I really hate to be working on something that doesn’t have a title, so it’s one of my earliest brainstorming stages to come up with one. Most of the time I’ll have a bunch of ideas bouncing around in my head for a few days, running through options on jogs or while cleaning, and then boom, something will click. Maybe it’s putting words together that I hadn’t tried before (like with The Star Siren). Or it’s using something story-specific but also dramatic and evocative (like Hooded or Vagabonds). Once it’s there, it’s very hard for me to shift. It feels a little like naming a child!

Who is your favorite character from your book and would you get along?

My favorite character would definitely have to be Iara, the pirate queen in Hooded and Severed. It’s funny because she was supposed to be a side-character in the background of the first book, plot-relevant but not destined to stick around. But when Iara showed up on the page, she swept me away with her magnetism and swagger. In classic Iara fashion, she refused to be shunted to the role of sidekick and therefore ended up playing a much larger role in Severed than I’d originally intended. She also got her own spin-off short story (All Hail the Pirate Queen) which is available free to my newsletter subscribers, and will be pivotal in the final book, Bladed.

Furthermore, just for you all on here, I’ll share that she might also be getting her own trilogy very soon. Stay posted if you want to hear more!

What are you working on next?

My next great challenge is the final book in the Furix Rising series, Bladed. That one’s going to be huge for me because not only am I closing out my first series ever, I’m also trying to pull together the threads of at least a dozen subplots, not to mention keep my world-building consistent and give all my characters satisfying arcs. I keep telling my husband that it’ll be a miracle if I pull it off, but hey, miracles happen.

After that, I want to finish my Scottstown Heroes small-town superheroes series (which starts with Vagabonds, which you can read for free). There are 3 more books and 2 more novellas in that world I want to write. I also have Iara’s spin-off that’s been percolating in my brain, along with a young adult sci-fi trilogy, a fantasy western, and tons more.

I won’t be short on work anytime soon!

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

Oh goodness, where to start? I grew up on Harry Potter, obviously, along with Artemis Fowl, Pendragon, and Lord of the Rings. In my adult writing life, I’ve been extremely inspired by the Illuminae Files, which I find to be one of the best examples of pure entertainment that I’ve read in recent memory. Also the Red Rising series by Pierce Brown, which has an amazing trilogy arc. I love general fiction and have recently been way into Taylor Jenkins Reid, especially Daisy Jones and the Six and Malibu Rising. Although if I’m honest, the book that’s influenced my writing more than any other is John Truby’s Anatomy of Story, which is basically my writing bible. 

What is your favorite meal?

Sushi! I could eat sushi every day from now until the end of time and never get tired of it. With the amount of soy sauce I use I’d probably pickle myself, but it would be a glorious way to die.

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

I’m a weirdo and like black coffee at room temperature so I can taste all the flavors, especially when I blend some cacao nibs in with the beans. It’s delicious!

And since I’m married to someone whose family owns a winery, I’m legally obligated to say wine. But I do enjoy a good sour when he’s not looking.

Describe yourself in three words.

Passionate, Contrarian, Relentless  

Thank you for inviting me! 

Bio: A. A. Woods is a Boston-based Hispanic author of science fiction and fantasy. After a childhood in Montana and a few exciting years in Costa Rica, her family finally settled in the northeast to escape the sun. There, she went to the University of Vermont for a degree in Molecular Genetics, which has been useful for terrifying the hypochondriacs in her life. She’s traveled to over 20 countries, been struck by lightning, and worked in a morgue, which could explain a lot. When not writing, she can usually be found trying to exhaust the new family dog.

Hated.
Hunted.
Hooded.

In a land of myths and monsters, 17-year-old Carlette is a slave. Her power of enhabitation, the ability to control animals, makes her useful to the island’s colonial rulers. Convinced she’s on the right side, she spends her life doing their bidding, awaiting the day she gets to leave it all behind and fulfill her purpose in their war across the sea.

But when an escaped spy forces her to leave the safety of the road, Carlette is plunged into the wilderness with a handsome enemy by her side, rebels at her back, and only her wits to guide her. Among the giant trees of the magical forest, Carlette will begin to realize her world is much more complicated than she’s been led to believe.

Will she learn to see through the lies she was raised on? Will she have the courage to choose heart over duty?

And will she do it fast enough to save everyone she loves?


For fans of Princess Mononoke and Six of Crows, this dark fantasy is Little Red Riding Hood as you’ve never seen it before.

Posted in Blog

Today I’d like to introduce T.E. Kessler, author of Holding Out For A Hero, book one of the Jelvia: Not Human series

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

My pen name is T E Kessler, but under my real name (Louise Wise), I started my journey writing shorts for women’s magazines. I’d written many books before then, but like most authors, I could never strike lucky with a publishing deal and became disheartened.

Then one day, I had a rejection letter from an agent who’d sent my typescript off to Simon & Schuster, and S & S left their notes tucked inside the typescript. To this day, I don’t know if the agent left them in on purpose because, although the notes were rejecting the book, they were full of praise, labelling me as ‘up and coming’.

Anyway, those notes urged me to continue publishing as an independent author. Today, EDEN (written under my real name) is one of my best sellers.

What is HOLDING OUT FOR A HERO all about?

Imagine a world where humanity is threatened by another species. But it’s still the 21st century, we still go out to work, enjoy vacations and watch Netflix on the TV. But in this world, living alongside us is a species called Jelvia. They are disease resistant, stronger, larger and venomous.

It’s believed that the essence of a Jelvia is to kill humans to become the supreme being, but it later comes out that they are following orders from a hierarchy. This hierarchy is simply called ‘the committee’, which deploys instructions straight into the Jelvia’s head.

But a group of Jelvias have turned against this committee. Instead of killing to order, they kill human criminals, which controls the urge to kill. It’s a small step to guard against the annihilation of humanity.

Then there are us—humans—who are too frightened to question the whys and hows of the Jelvian world and carry on as normal. Yet some of us recognise that something isn’t right with the world, but their voice is unheard so far.

The series is called Jelvia: Not Human and will be a total of six books. The genre is sci-fi romance for over 18s (there are between-the-sheets scenes that aren’t suitable for minors).

Describe your desk / writing space.

My office is the smallest room at the back of the house. Its only window is a skylight, but it’s quiet, and I like it. I have pictures of nebules and all things ‘outer space’ on my wall, and a doll from the movie ET has pride of place on my desk. So yup, I’m a bit of an astronomy geek!

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

No, routine. Luckily, I haven’t experienced writers’ block, and I can quickly jump in and out of my writing. I prefer to write in the afternoons or evenings. I’m not a morning person, and my thoughts are barely intelligible until after lunch!

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

The hardest scene is turning Narcifer (Jelvia hero) into the baddie.

Shock crossed his face, rapidly followed by a revulsion. It was an emotion she never wanted to see on his face while looking at her. But before she could react, that same strange light she’d seen before danced in his eyes.

She watched it a moment but then he bent down and hauled her up. He tossed her over his shoulder as if she weighed nothing, then carried her up the stairs and almost threw her onto the bed.

She twisted to the side and tried to get away from him, but he grabbed her hip and pulled her around on her back. He held her down with one hand while his other hand tugged out of his jeans.

Freed from his constraints, he crawled onto the bed and moved over her on all fours. His body wasn’t touching her; his hands were on either side of her head, his knees on either side of her thighs. His eyes were filled with white electric, and they were focused on her breasts; his breath was ragged. She felt exposed, vulnerable.

‘Stop!’

They stared at one another, and she raised a hand to touch his face. The strange lights in his eyes danced. She remembered asking if an angry Jelvia was the safest kind, and he’d replied, ‘and one making love.’

Then the moment was gone, and his knee roughly parted her legs, and before she had a chance to take a breath, he thrust into her hard. It was without emotion. There was no tenderness.

It actually hurt to write that scene. I think he redeemed himself, though. My favourite scenes are the funnies between Macy and her bestie, Courtney. It’s where I can unleash my sarcastic British humour to its maximum! Luckily, I have an American editor to keep me in check.

What inspired your book/series?

I wanted to write an alien/human contact series that’s original, so I came up with the idea of not having the alien know he is an alien! But the inspiration came from years and years ago when EDEN (my book written under Louise Wise) was a mere dream of an astronaut stranded on the moon. This was looooong before the movies Gravity and Stranded (inferior to my series, if you ask me!)

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

Wales. On top of a mountain. I don’t like heat, so Britain is my country of choice (England is my home), but where I live it’s flat with no hills or rugged mountain ranges and although the countryside is beautiful with its thatched-roof cottages and ancient churches, rolling fields and hedgerows, the rugged mountain ranges in Wales are breathtaking. And it’s only three hours away from where I live!

But oh, I’ve been to Venice and that’s fabulous, too. And the Balearic islands, with Minorca in particular, is beautiful. So many places, but the heat will devour me, so GB is the only place, I guess, and as they say, home is where the heart is!

How do you come up with the title to your books?

Macy (main character), in Holding out for a Hero, mother was murdered. Macy, at the time, was only a child but could never come to terms with her mum’s death and subconsciously is looking for a ‘hero’ to fight the injustices in the world. That she falls in love with an assassin is the cusp of the story. Is he a good assassin or bad? With Jelvias you can never tell!

What are you working on next?

Next in the Jelvia: Not Human series is Surviving her Dominant, where I bring out the ‘brain injury’ suffered by the Jelvia, Aldarn.

Here, I hope the reader is beginning to realise that there is something more to Jelvias than just ‘another species of human’. I never tell the reader the Jelivas are aliens in the first book (or second or third, come to that), and like the human characters, it’s something they gradually figure out themselves.

It isn’t a spoiler, don’t worry. And readers who have read Eden and Hunted by Louise Wise will already know where the Jelvias originate from.

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

I love Dean Koontz. He can terrorise without resorting to gutter language and smutty scenes (my books have both). And on the other side of the book coin, I enjoy a good rom-com by Matt Dunn or Sophie Kinsella.

What is your favorite meal?

If the scene has the right ambience: music, lighting, convo, company, all food will be my favourite. I love eating out, and I’m no cook—in fact, I’m dire. My family cheer when I order food.

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

Everything is in its place. Coffee in the morning, a cup of tea at any other time, and wine if my day requires it (which is most of the time!) But you didn’t mention cocktails… hmmmmm

Describe yourself in three words.

Loner. Empathic. Worrier.

Who says your boyfriend has to be human?

Macy’s life changed forever when, as a child, her mother was murdered. The killers were never found, and Macy grew up looking for injustices and making them right.

She became a journalist, interviewing celebrities but lately found stardom shallow and pretentious.

There was just no putting right a teen-idol rockstar.

Things changed when her best friend was attacked but rescued by an unlikely hero.

The hero was a Jelvia.

Humans lived in fear of the Jelvia.

The Jelvia killed humans for fun.

Macy just saw a hero that she’d been looking for all her life.

This sci-fi romance contains some mature scenes, but if you’re looking for a hero, drop right in!

Posted in Blog

Today, I’m happy to introduce, Randi Rayl author of the series The Bone Gathers

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

I have always been a storyteller.  While waiting for the next episode in a TV series to air, I would imagine the possible scenarios. And to the chagrin of my family, speak the anticipated dialogue aloud while in house and in public. Nothing to see here…just a girl talking to people who aren’t there! I had written so many stories that I never finished because grammar and I are not on the best of terms.  But then a friend of mine explained you hire people to edit your work. It was like a light bulb.  I could actually finish a book.  So, I did! And my first novel (The Split) under my other penname, Randi Harvey, was published in 2018. 

Describe your desk / writing space.

YIKES!  I am sitting beside my sewing machine covered in string and knick-knacks: a two-dollar bill, Santa pictures, straight pins, a bank ledger, surrounded by hundreds of books on the shelves, my first agent rejection letter taped to the wall, and a myriad of other this-and-that’s.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

If I have an editing deadline, I am inspired to not lose my deposit, and I write to hit it.  Right now, I am in between series so I have been taking my time promoting the most recent one (The Bone Gatherers).

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

I hate connecting scenes.  But what I like and what I am good at seem to be at odds. Love describing characters and their outfits.  But it has come to my attention I am a quite proficient at writing a “damn good sex scene” as my content editor put it.  And before you ask, I’ll fill you in.  No, my sex life is not as colorful as my characters’.  I’m a mom of two young boys.  My husband and I are lucky to hide behind a locked bedroom door while avoiding eye contact with a curious dog and cat for five minutes while my kids are rocking out to Story Bot songs in the next room.

What inspired your book/series?

I wanted to write stories that align with existing folklore and so many mythologies have already been done.  When I came across the Aztec folklore, I knew it was fresh and new, so I ran with it.

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

We have moved a lot so I would like to change it every few years.  But I love Thailand.  I love Mexico and I can’t wait for COVID to be over so I can start exploring other places in the world. And obviously, I’d love to live in the Wizarding World of Harry Potter.  #teamgryffindor

How do you come up with the title to your books?

I try a few out on the tongue and then google them to make sure they haven’t been “taken” already. But titles have always come easy to me.  Writing the book blurbs are a nightmare!

What are you working on next?

I have a new thriller book I have written a bit of an outline for and several scenes about old Hollywood actresses.  I have also delved into Sato’s (a b character in the Bone Gatherer series) story.  It’s a different series with new characters following the Fae of the Norse (as the series is named).

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

I love Sarah J Maas, the Gears couple, Diana Gabaldon.  I just started reading Harry Potter (don’t judge).

What is your favorite meal?

Sushi or Thai food

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

Wine or beer? Coffee & Wine…no question

Describe yourself in three words.

Creative – honest – boss-bitch (the hyphen counts 😊)

Anything other thoughts? 

My second book, Choosing Fire, (SCROLL DOWN TO GET YOUR COPY) will be available on amazon for FREE August 17th through the 21st.  Links provided. And if you liked the book, please leave me a review.  If you didn’t, then I have disabled the review feature for these novels 😉 

Last, I am currently under quarantine recovering from COVID.  I am vaccinated and, thankfully, didn’t have to be hospitalized.  Please please please don’t go through what I, my husband, and two small boys are going through right now.  Get your shot, wear a mask, and be kind to one another.  We love you!

Sofia thought she had her life figured out, but death had other plans…


A dedicated nurse, Sofia lives for helping her patients and their families. She doesn’t mind the long hours and tedious work. She has a loving boyfriend, a cute apartment, and a paid-off car. Life is perfect. Until her patients begin to die at an alarming rate, and almost always when the new tall, dark, and handsome nurse is on duty. Growing suspicious of her new co-worker, Sofia decides to take matters into her own hands and catch Eztlie in the act when she stumbles upon the real demonic killer, instead. Before she can become the creature’s next victim, Eztlie kills the monster and saves her life.

The elusive Eztlie isn’t a real nurse, he’s an ancient Aztec warrior from another time. Upon his death, the King of the Dead made Eztlie part of an elite team of demon hunters, sworn to protect mankind and rid the world of monsters that want to steal the souls of the living. It’s the kind of life that doesn’t give him much time for commitments or relationships of any kind, and that’s just fine with him.

But as Eztlie and Sofia get closer to finding the māpach wreaking havoc on her patients, they also find themselves getting closer to one another. But can Sofia trust the aloof immortal whose mere touch sets her body on fire? Or will that same fire consume her, body and soul, until there’s nothing left?

For centuries, Xel has loved her fellow warrior, Xi. Always aloof, Xi may give Xel his time, but he has never given her his heart. To make matters worse, Xel has been harboring a secret. 

She has the power of flames. A power that if discovered by the king of the underworld can lead to a life of servitude by his command. Xel thought her life was as good as she could hope for. That is until a stranger crashes into her world. 

Teya is a Sentinel, a leader of the earthbound warriors, and he’s tasked to collect information from the Bone Gatherers on the demon infestation. But when he meets Xel, his mission changes. Engrossed by her beauty, he discovers her secret and begs her to join him in the underworld to train with the other Sentinels. 

Leaving her family and Xi behind, Xel embarks on a new journey with the mysterious Teya, who worships her in ways she never knew possible. 

But when Xel suspects there is more to the underworld than meets the eye, she longs for home and the man who has held her heart for centuries. 

Torn, Xel must choose between the man who adores her or the one who has stoked the flames within her for centuries. The wrong choice could mean not just her death, but the destruction of everyone, and everything, she’s ever loved.

Posted in Blog

Book Spotlight

Holding Out For A Hero By T.E. Kessler @TE_Kessler

Who says your boyfriend has to be human?

Macy’s life changed forever when, as a child, her mother was murdered. The killers were never found, and Macy grew up looking for injustices and making them right.

She became a journalist, interviewing celebrities but lately found stardom shallow and pretentious.

There was just no putting right a teen-idol rockstar.

Things changed when her best friend was attacked but rescued by an unlikely hero.

The hero was a Jelvia.

Humans lived in fear of the Jelvia.

The Jelvia killed humans for fun.

Macy just saw a hero that she’d been looking for all her life.

This sci-fi romance contains some mature scenes, but if you’re looking for a hero, drop right in!

Posted in Blog

Today, I’m happy to introduce the author of the Kingdom of Wind & Fire, R.A. Lewis.

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

I’ve always wanted to write, and often wrote as a child. My stories back then rarely had a coherent plot, and the characters often changed genders part way through but I loved telling stories even then. My mother says that I was telling stories as soon as I could speak. It grew from there. A few years ago after ending a creatively draining job, I decided to stop putting off my dream of writing and dive in head first. Ten books later and here we are!

I am often inspired by every day things, but I’ve always had a wild imagination, as well as I’ve always been a big book worm. I love writing about trauma and emotion in my stories, and I strive to make realistic characters that you can identify with. Writing for me is part therapy, part desire to tell a compelling story.

Describe your desk / writing space.

I write in my tiny office, surrounded by all my nerdy things and a TON of books. I desperately need new book shelves as my current ones are overflowing and double stacked. It’s a bit chaotic but I love it. I also have a reading chair in my office, and usually at least one dog and a few cats around for company. Sometimes the whole crew of two dogs and four cats comes in, and it feels crowded but comfy. I write on a desktop with double monitors which is nice for being able to go back and forth between research and writing.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

I don’t have much of a specific writing routine, although I probably should. I wear headphones with ambient sounds every time I write because it helps block out external stimuli. Sometimes when I’m struggling to focus I have a mini ritual: I do some light meditation, put on my headphones and play some sort of ambient sound (usually wind in the trees or falling snow), then light a pretty candle and get to writing. I have ADHD and struggle with focus so sometimes all it takes it shutting off social media and doing a ritual to get me back on track. If that doesn’t work, then I take a walk. And if THAT doesn’t work, I usually give up for the day and come back later.

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

I would say the first scenes and the last ones are equally difficult to write. Perhaps even the middle of the book can be tough, because my brain is often ten steps ahead of my fingers. But I also think that the last scene and the first scene are also my favorite. The first scene holds all the excitement of starting a new story, and the last scene holds the satisfaction of a finished one.

What inspired your book/series?

Well, each book is different and I have a few series out. Usually I draw inspiration from movies or tv shows I’ve watched, past books I’ve read, my own personal experiences, previous work/jobs/friends/clients/family, or nature. Occasionally music inspires me, as it did for The Elemental Kingdoms Series. The very first scene was inspired by a Celtic song, and the books blossomed from there. My Valdir Chronicles started out as a writing prompt from a friend who told me to write a virgin obsessed wyvern. Suddenly I was 9 chapters deep with a whole series blooming before me. My newest series, Crowe Trials, was inspired by my love of Celtic Mythology as well as the Fae trend in fantasy these days.

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

In this world? Scotland. Just outside Edinburgh or on the Isle of Skye. In the US? Northern California in the mountains near Shasta and Lassen. In a fantasy world? Tortall or the Wizarding World or maybe Middle Earth.).

How do you come up with the title to your books?

Usually they just come to me. Sometimes I go off popular title naming, and sometimes I search title lists of similar books, and then use a thesaurus to come up with themes/ideas from my book. I try to boil down what my book is about/represents before I move forward with a title.

What are you working on next?

I’m working on the main part of the Crowe Trials series. I have three books planned beyond the novella which released last month. I’m well into book one, Rook & Lion, now. This first book is a mix of The Selection, Cruel Prince, and Hunger Games mixed with Dark Fantasy Romance. I’m excited to get this out!

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

Oh man. Asking a book worm who their favorite author is, or favorite book, is so dangerous! Here are a few that I ADORE and would love to write similarly to: Tamora Pierce, Garth Nix, Cinda Williams Chima, Sherwood Smith, Jaqueline Carey, Scott Lynch, Pierce Brown, V.E. Schwab… the list goes on! But every book I read usually influences my writing in some way.

What is your favorite meal?

I don’t think I have just one. I recently had bariatric surgery, so my meals have drastically changed, but I’d have to say Mexican food. I love tacos and burritos and fajitas. I love shrimp or fish or steak. I mostly stick to protein and veggies, but beans and cheese are a guilty pleasure of mine. That, and a poached egg on avocado toast. So yummy!

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

I rarely drink alcohol, and usually it’s a hard cider, a Moscow mule, or a gin and tonic. And as much as I adore coffee, I don’t drink it often due to it hurting my stomach (although I do drink cold brew on occasion). I much prefer tea, and my go to drink is a london fog.

Describe yourself in three words.

Imaginative, loyal, emotional.

Blood is magic. Magic is everything. And it can get you killed.

Twins Brianna and Brayden have had to hide their volatile elemental powers all their lives. But now they must use them if they want to survive.

After fifteen years apart, Brayden escapes enslavement to a SpiritSinger who controls his every move. No sooner has he reunited with his family when the twins’ mother is captured by the same enemy.

The twins must make an impossible choice: to rescue her or follow her last wish. With the help of a snarky smuggler and his crew, Brayden and Brianna embark on a quest to hone their magical skills and save their mother.

But evil is brewing on the horizon, and it’s coming for anyone with power.

Posted in Blog

Today, I’m happy to introduce the author of the Dingo & Sister, Nikky Lee.

Click on, Dingo & Sister at the bottom of the page to get a FREE COPY!!!!

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

Kia ora, I’m a New Zealand-based author of fantasy, science fiction and horror for adults and older teens. While I now call New Zealand home, I originally hail from sunny Perth on the west coast of Australia, a city with two claims of fame: the most isolated capital city in the world and its “shark infested” waters. (Fun fact: between May and December 2017, Surf Life Saving Western Australia had 1400 shark reports.) 

Growing up, my TV idols were the SG-1 team from Stargate and Max from Dark Angel (I guess that says a lot about me!) Book wise: not so surprisingly, Harry Potter was a main go-to, along withTamora Pierce’s The Immortals, K. A. Applegate’s Animorphs, anything by Paul Jennings, and the occasional Goosebumps book. I also real a tonneof Japanese manga, too many to list here. 

I began writing when I was about 13 after drawing a character during the summer holiday break. Over a few weeks, the story of this character grew and grew inside my head. I’d tell it to myself whenever I had a spare moment—doing the chores, waiting for the bus, during TV ad breaks—until it got to the point where I couldn’t hold all the details of the story in my head. And as I struggled to keep hold of it all I stopped being able to tell myself new parts of the story. At last, exasperated, I started writing it down so I could clear some mental real estate to figure the next bit of the story out. 

Fast forward nearly 20 years and here I am, still writing stories out of my head. 

Describe your desk / writing space.

I have a desk, but I only use it while I’m editing so I can have a second screen. When in drafting mode I’m on the sofa, usually typing around a cat who’s squeezed herself in between the laptop and me. In winter, there are blankets and slippers in the mix too.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

I work full-time and am a natural night owl, so I write late in the evenings, usually while my husband watches TV (I have a really good set of headphones!). Since I work to deadlines (usually my own) I’ve learned that I can’t wait for the muse to arrive—I have to coax it out as I go. Sometimes it comes, sometimes it doesn’t, but I can always go back and edit those bits.

I try to write most days as I’ve found it harder to get the words flowing again when I take too long a break, particularly when I’m in the middle of something long and complex.

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

100% the ending. I cried while writing it. I won’t give too much away (other than to say no, the dingo doesn’t die). But I had to walk away from the keyboard after writing it I was so emotionally rung. 

What inspired your book/series?

Dingo & Sister was actually a challenge to myself to prove I could write characters. Up until then, I had this belief that I wrote great plots but my characters were so-so. What’s more, I often needed a lot of words to bring them to life. The goal for Dingo & Sister was to create compelling characters in as fewer word as possible.

In terms of inspiration, much of it came from a train trip I did across the Nullabor—a desert plain that runs across the Great Australian Bite. It’s a two-day trip; you go to sleep one night seeing bushland and scrub outside the window then wake up the next morning to vast, utterly flat red desert. It’s quite surreal. We took the trip right in the middle of summer and the heat was something else, floating around 45C (113F) when we got out of the train at its midway stop.

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

Given many fantasies and sci-fis are either war-torn kingdoms (or on the brink of it) or have gross social, political and/or environmental problems, I think I’ll stick with New Zealand (but maybe somewhere in the South Island near the mountains, preferably with a good coffee shop nearby).

How do you come up with the title to your books?

Oddly, the title for Dingo & Sister was one of the earliest elements of the story I decided on. Normally I umm and ahh over titles, often workshopping them in my online and local writing groups. Some years ago there was a manga called Lone Wolf and Cub—I never got around to reading it (another one for the TBR pile!) but the title always stuck with me. When I started writing this story, I figured why not use a similar naming convention since the ‘wolf and cub’ title was so memorable for me. 

What are you working on next?

I’m currently working on the second book of my debut trilogy—an epic fantasy about a girl bound in a blood pact to a monster. Think The Witcher meets Shadow and Bone. I recently revealed the cover of the first book, The Rarkyn’s Familiar, which comes out in April next year (and is available for pre-order!).

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

A lot! I’m something of a chameleon writer and my style will vary a little depending on the type of story I’m telling. I’ve had a lot of fun experimenting with style and voice in my short fiction, taking elements from the voices of Peter McLean and Madeline Miller and combining it with the weirdness of Paul Jennings. 

For my longer works, one of my most significant fantasy influences is Robin Hobb—she writes some of the most vivid characters in the genre (imo). On the science fiction front, William Gibson’s Neuromancer, Neal Stephenson’s Snow Crash, Isaac Asimov’s Foundation and Vonda McIntyre’s Dreamsnake come to mind. On the manga side, seminal works such as Princess Mononoke, Akira, Ghost in the Shell, and Berserk have been hugely influential.

What is your favorite meal?

Oo, tough choice. I love tacos, curries and stir-fries, but I think my grandmother’s mac and cheese recipe is my favorite. Quick and easy too (but not very healthy).

All right…prime grade ribeye steak, sous vide’d and grilled medium rare.

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

I love a good coffee, but I’m sensitive to caffeine so I’ve had to cut back. These days it’s a coffee in the morning to get me going then fruit teas after that. One of my local tea shops does a nougat flavored tea that is AMAZING. I much prefer wine or cider over beer, Pino Gris is my go-to.

Describe yourself in three words.

Persistent (some might say stubborn). Curious. Loyal.  

Nikky Lee is an award-winning author who grew up as a barefoot 90s kid in Perth, Western Australia on Whadjuk Noongar Country. She now lives in Aotearoa New Zealand with a husband, a dog and a couch potato cat. In her free time she writes speculative fiction, often burning the candle at both ends to explore fantastic worlds, mine asteroids and meet wizards. She’s had over two dozen stories published in magazines, anthologies and on radio. Her debut novel, The Rarkyn’s Familiar—an epic tale of a girl bonded to a monster—will be published by Parliament House Press in 2022.

Posted in Blog

Today, I’m happy to introduce the author of the series Forensics and Fantasy, Michael Angel.

Click on, Forensics and Dragon Fire at the bottom of the page to get a FREE COPY!!!!

Tell me about yourself. What inspired you to write?

I’ve been writing short stories since I was in fourth grade! Later in life, I decided to enter the field writing non-fiction books. I wrote four of the For Dummies books, which put me on the map. Then I moved over into fiction writing after studying under the great Dean Wesley Smith and Kris Rusch and haven’t looked back.

Describe your desk / writing space.

LOL, it’s a standard computer desk, laid out without too much clutter. The big issues for any writer are ergonomics – if you compromise your wrist posture or seating, you’ll pay for it down the line! About the one luxury I’ll admit to is a mesh-seat and backed chair that lets air circulate around you so you don’t get overheated.

Do you have a writing routine or do you write when inspired?

I wish I had a more consistent writing routine, but sometimes life interferes. However, I put in some good hours in front of the screen every day. You need to practice writing at speed for long stretches to get things done.

What was the hardest scene for you to write? Which scene was your favorite to write?

I literally cried when I had to write the death scene of one of the major characters. It’s one of those oddities of this profession…that you grieve over the death of a person who’ll never exist outside of your own head.

It’s even more amazing when you make other people cry over this, too.

On the other hand, you can feel the exhilaration of whenever the main character pulls themselves out of a hopeless scrape. When they come out a little ahead of where they started.

What inspired your book/series?

I have the exact moment on audio tape! I was listening to a lecture by Kris Rusch about how you can come up with new ideas by smashing together unlikely combinations. One example she gave was ‘How about writing like C.S. Lewis on speed?’

I thought: “Hm, how about C.S. Lewis meets C.S.I.?”

And that’s how the 10-book Fantasy & Forensics series was born!

What authors or books have influenced your writing?

Aside from Kris Rusch and Dean Smith, there’s a bunch: Roger Zelazny, Jack Chalker, JRR Tolkien, David Eddings, Clive Cussler, David Preston, and Michael Critchton. How’s that for a start?

How do you come up with the title to your books?

Ideally, a title should instantly tell the reader the book’s genre, and maybe give a clue as to what the book’s about. For the first book in my Fantasy & Forensics series, you have centaurs, and a crime they’re supposed to have committed: Centaur of the Crime. Or the free novella featured here, which involves a dragon and the use of forensics to solve a crime: Forensics and Dragon Fire.

What are you working on next?

I’m finishing up another book in the Plague Walker Medical Thriller series, and then I’ll be swinging back to fantasy again!

If you could live anywhere, in this world or fantasy, where would you live?

I love Texas Hill Country, which is close to where I already live. Perhaps in a hilltop villa surrounded by gnarled valley oaks, with views overlooking the vineyards of a local winery.

On the other hand, I believe one of the perks of living in Tolkien’s land of Númenor was immortality, along with a nice Mediterranean climate. So…yeah, I’d at least rent a condo there.

What is your favorite meal?

Good lord, I’m a total foodie…you’d make me choose ONE meal?

All right…prime grade ribeye steak, sous vide’d and grilled medium rare.

Coffee or tea? Wine or beer?

Diet Cola with a lot of ice, please. I like my caffeine cold.

Describe yourself in three words.

Ignores instructions to a fault. 😊